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20121215
20121215
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at the podium. he can second will be eric trager. he is the washington institute's next generation fellow. he is a doctoral candidate at the university of pennsylvania where he completed a dissertation and he is going to give us some special insight into some of the details of mohammed morsi and the muslim brotherhood in the quest to achieve a constitution. and then we have third, i am pleased to introduce a diplomat of the area. he served in egypt for 2005 through 2010. shalom cohen. he has considerable it's aryans with the relationship and the politics we are seeing on the ground today. first we have steve and eric and then shalom cohen, and then we will open up the discussion for your questions and comments. >> good afternoon. it is a tremendous ledger to be back at the washington institute. i feel a a little nervous, i feel like i'm performing for my first grade teacher again. but it is a great pleasure. this is where, as rob pointed out, my career began. also, those of you who know me, this is where my family began. i am sure that many of you in washington can relate to what is going on
's washington office. she's always been on the cutting edge of things that really matter. let me start off by saying i do not think there is an anti- innovation caucus. i do not think there is anybody who is opposed to innovation. it is a little bit like apple pie or rg3. let me ask you all to describe what we really mean by innovation. what are the two or three priorities we ought to really be talking about? glenn? >> let's start on that side. >> i thought you'd start on that side. >> i go to my right first. >> there are three types of innovation. one is scientific innovation that allows the second innovation which is the technology innovation, to take the underlying discovery and commercialize its, turning it into a product that can be used for consumer customers. what is equally important is how you can then take a discovery, it turned into a technology, and you can deliver it in a way that allows you to build a business that gets you a margin that can support the business. basic science innovation, technology innovations, and business model innovations are the ones we think of. google
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
," which is a classic of washington, i think, no one should go to washington without reading that book. [laughter] max boot, in the times when laws and rules and principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he's become thee authoritative voice on military affairs always with amazing, consistent, unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in the field which is marked often by to littization, and we are looking forward to more work. jay, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought an international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm, and you see his name, the authors line, you know you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and with writings that go across the culture of the country and the arts. calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] after they call it, nobody can ever say "nobel peace prize" again without saying so ironically. i'll turn it over to them, and i think we'll start with elliot, if
street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national security journalists. susan's the editor-in-chief of fore
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5